The Mail I Get

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10

Apr 2014

The Mail I Get Rerun – Stop Looking for a Short Cut

Posted by / in The Mail I Get / 12 comments

Here’s a golden oldie from yesteryear’s mailbag..

I received a polite email from a guy on the East Coast who says he has a great idea for an episodic legal drama:

Though I spend a great deal of my time developing and
selling creative concepts (for direct marketing applications), I’m not a script
writer.  I’m contacting you because I’m looking for a talented television writer
with industry credibility that might be interested in partnering to develop a
pilot. If you are interested in exploring this or know of a
writer who might be,  please let me know.

I get this offer several times a week from people outside the industry who have “great ideas” but just need a guy like me to partner up with.

To be blunt, why would I want to do that? What’s in it for me? I’ve got lots of ideas of my own and all you’d be doing is benefitting from my experience, my “industry credibility,”  and years of hard work. What do you bring to the table? An idea.  Sorry, but that’s not enough.

short-cut-mazeThere’s a saying in television, ideas are cheap and execution is everything. The networks  don’t buy ideas, they buy ability, experience, point-of-view, and a track record.  LOST is not a great idea — People shipwrecked on an island. It has been done a hundred times before. What ABC bought was hit-maker JJ Abrams doing people shipwrecked on an island.  NYPD BLUE is not a great idea. It’s cops in NY solving crimes. What ABC bought was Steven Bochco doing cops in NY solving crimes.  They also bought the proven ability of JJ Abrams and Steven Bochco to write and produce a series.

I know… that’s what you need me for, right? You need my “industry credibility” and “talent.”
But here’s the thing: there’s absolutely no upside in it for me, or any other established writer-producer, partnering up with you.  We didn’t work for years to establish “industry credibility” so someone else without any could take a shortcut and ride on our coat-tails.

If you were a bestselling novelist with an idea, that’s something else. You have something to offer beyond an idea.  You bring your name,  reputation, and proven track record as a storyteller. If you were a  famous actor, that’s something else. You bring your image,  your fans, and proven ability to draw a large audience.  If you were an ex-D.A., and your idea draws on your background in the field, then you have something to offer. You bring years worth of courtroom experience  and credibility in the field (for instance, I’ve partnered with cops before to pitch ideas based on their unique experiences).

I think you get my point.  Thank you for thinking of me, but I’m not interested.

That’s what I told him. Here’s his reply:

Feel the need to vent?  No problem!  Since we don’t each other, it can’t be
personal.  A simple, “not interested” would have done the trick though.
The television saying you mentioned….we say that same thing in
marketing and advertising!  Since I’m a professional in my chosen field too
(no, really), I receive numerous offers to partner from people looking to break
in.  Though it almost never goes anywhere, I usually offer some slight
encouragement.  The upside is so much greater than the downside and the cost to
let it play out is so insignificant…..so why not?

Instead of offering encouragement, I offer honesty and reality. Obviously, you didn’t want to hear either. You can’t expect to scrawl a drawing of a car on a napkin and sell it to Ford… why should you expect it to happen with a TV series idea? The way to break in is not to look for shortcuts, for a way to start at the top…which is what you are trying to do.  The way to break in is to write a terrific script, get hired as a freelancer on a show, get picked up on staff, then work your way up the writer/producer ladder until you reach the point in your career when someone from a studio or network calls and says “Hey, got any ideas for a series?”

As for the networks buying years of
experience and a track record……I sincerely hope that is true (means better
television).  The jury seems to be out though:  Overnight
successes…..Schwartz, who at 27 created The O.C….Trey Parker and Matt Stone
created South Park while they were still in college.

I figured that’s where you were coming from.  You didn’t do your homework.  Josh Schwartz worked on other shows and wrote other pilots before THE OC.  Parker and Stone made a short animated film, THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS,  that wowed the industry. That short film proved their skill as animators/writers/performers and  they got a series… based on that short film. They weren’t car salesmen from Topeka with a really great idea for an animated TV series.

What must I have been thinking when I contacted
you?  I mean…how on earth could a professional television writer really be
interested in what someone from outside the industry has to offer?
“. CSI, the No. 1 show was created by relative newcomer, Anthony
E. Zuiker…. CBS hired experienced writer-producers Carol Mendelsohn and Ann
Donahue to run the show…”

shortcutAgain, you aren’t doing your homework. Zuiker didn’t sell his idea by emailing producers with a come-on saying he had a great idea for a show and he just needed someone with “industry credibility” to sell it for him.  He wrote a script.  From the CSI Files Website:

Zuiker himself got his start when childhood friend Dustin Lee Abraham, now a CSI scribe but then an actor, would get Zuiker to
write him monologues for auditions. “I wrote a speech about a man, mentally
retarded, watching his wife give birth. He’s a degenerate gambler, and he went
into an announcing [mode, a play by play],” Zuiker says of the monologue that
got him attention in Hollywood. The speech was turned into a movie, The
Runner
, which was made for seven million dollars. It turned out to be
Zuiker’s gateway to Hollywood.

You’re wowed by what you think are strike-it-big-in-Hollywood-quick stories that really aren’t.  Stop looking for a short-cut.  The best way to sell a series is to write some great scripts. Don’t look for someone with “industry credibility,” earn some of your own instead.

UPDATE: 4/10/2014

Someone named Jerome read this post and actually sent me this question:

Hey Lee: I get where you are coming from regarding someone with what they believe is a great idea for a TV show wanting to partner up with you. But I wonder what if someone came to you with an idea that has never been done before in a TV show? And if that idea for a premise had never been done before and could be executed well then that may be a possible reason why someone would want to partner up with someone else? I guess I am saying this because whenever I hear many of the pilots that are going to premiere it is upon hearing the “premise” that I start to think this is another tired old idea that has been done before again and again.

This has to be a prank, right? I mean, how could anybody read this post and then send me that question? Assuming it’s not a prank, holy crap, some people are really DENSE. As I said before, ideas are cheap, execution is everything. A show about a cop teamed up with a robot has been done before. Many times. But Fox bought it because it was JJ Freaking Abrams who pitched it. They were buying him, and his team, not the idea. And JJ Freaking Abrams doesn’t need you to give him Your Idea For a Premise That Has Never Been Done Before. Because he’s JJ Freaking Abrams and can sell yet another show about a cop teamed with a robot without sharing a dime with you. Here’s his reply:

I get it ideas are cheap and though I wonder why NBC is launching that contest May 1st for anyone to enter in their “idea” for a sitcom and NBC will make and pay for numerous pilots from unknown unproven beginner people with no experience or credits?

There is a big difference between approaching a writer you dont know with your Idea For a Premise That Has Never Been Done Before and entering a contest hosted by a network…one presently mired at the bottom of the ratings and desperate for positive publicity. Let me ask you a question. Can you count how many times a network has had a contest soliciting sitcom ideas? I can. This is the one time. If I were you, I’d take advantage of it quick.

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12 comments
  • Bennett Klafter

    April 10, 2014, am30 10:28 AM
    01

    Well said, Lee. On another topic, I’ve lived NY, NJ, PA and Texas, but I have never run across or seen any commercials for Burgerville,until I read Mr. Monk In Outer Space. Was this a spoof of fast food restaurants on your part, or is does such a chain really exist? This is not a new phenomena, if it does exist. Franchises are historically slow in coming to NY and New England in general.They all seem like brand new companies when they do open up other, until one researches the company and finds that they have been around for a long time. Anyway, I have enjoyed the Mr. Monk series very much!Thank you for writing it.

    • Lee Goldberg

      April 10, 2014, am30 11:02 AM
      02

      I made up Burgerville…or at least I thought I did. A few weeks ago I got an email from someone saying there’s a Burgerville in Oregon.

      • Crystal

        April 10, 2014, pm30 1:11 PM
        03

        There are a bunch of Burgerville’s in Oregon.

        • Crystal

          April 10, 2014, pm30 1:12 PM
          04

          *Burgervilles

  • Dan Williams

    April 11, 2014, am30 5:48 AM
    05

    Just for fun, I googled “TV production companies” and got the Wikipedia page, which had 64 companies listed. “Spelling” caught my attention, but I learned they are owned by “CBS Productions” and aren’t active at the moment. Then, out of the blue, I tried “Jupiter Entertainment” (I’ve not heard of them). On their website, on the “Contact Us” page, they have a form that can be filled out and submitted to them. This is what they say:

    “Got an idea for a show?

    Do you have an idea for a television series? We welcome input from our viewers. Please fill out the form below and maybe your idea will be featured on one of our shows or will inspire a new series.”

    I mean, it can be done, right? But you gotta look around a bit, too. The process took me less than 3 minutes.

    • Lee Goldberg

      April 11, 2014, am30 10:48 AM
      06

      Dan, there are all kinds of production companies. Jupiter Entertainment specializes in reality shows.There is also a big difference between approaching a production company development exec with your brililant idea vs a WRITER or a network. My blog post specifically discusses the ineffectiveness of people approaching writer/producers they don’t know with ideas for scripted series programming.

      All of that said, NBC just announced a contest soliciting sitcom ideas. http://insidetv.ew.com/2014/04/08/nbc-sitcom-contest/

      • Dan Williams

        April 11, 2014, pm30 12:31 PM
        07

        Lee, I understand what you’re saying. And I’m not criticizing your position. You don’t want solicitations, period. And that’s your call. I just like to throw persons a bone, for trying,

    • Tim Curran

      April 11, 2014, pm30 3:34 PM
      08

      I was on Jupiter’s website for other reasons (I write/produce non-fiction TV) recently and saw their idea solicitation page. If I remember the language on the page right, you essentially transfer title to the idea and any associated copyright the moment you click the submit button. Not exactly the road to riches.

      • Dan Williams

        April 12, 2014, am30 3:51 AM
        09

        True, Tim, there may be a lot of ‘fine print’ involved, and getting ‘an idea’ into a produced TV show may not lead to immediate riches, but I’m thinking that ‘the democratization of TV’ is gaining momentum. The business seems to be opening up. For instance, companies like Netflix and Amazon are starting up their own TV-show production, and so is Microsoft. There’s more ways in than ever. And there’s increasing demand, I think, for ‘new ideas.’ Anyway, I was just looking at the issue positively.

        • Lee Goldberg

          April 12, 2014, pm30 1:14 PM
          10

          And take a look who Netflix, Amazon and Microsoft are dealing with for original programming: David Fincher. Chris Carter. Michael Connelly. Etc. Established showrunners and bestselling novelists. Not industry outsiders with no experience who have a “great idea.”

          • Dan Williams

            April 12, 2014, pm30 3:47 PM
            11

            Yes, the showrunners may be established, but the point is still valid:: if a person has an idea for a series or an episode, it’s never been better than now for getting into the business.

            Lee, it’s not only industry vets that can come up with ideas that deserve to be made into pilots. In fact, they tend to make the same show over and over again and to rip off somebody else’s premise. This kind of repetition is why TV viewing is down so much. But there’s lots of room for niche series. And this is where new-comers can shine.

            Anyway, I’d say to anybody who feels they have a ‘great idea’ to write it down and flesh it out and develop it. There’s lots of great animation programs out there, so why not produce your own pilot. It’s not about achieving ‘great success’ — it’s about make your idea real and maybe getting it aired — and we now live in a TV world where that’s possible.

  • A Palmful Of Gold | Nerd Gig

    July 9, 2014, pm31 6:27 PM
    12

    […] he reposted an entry titled “Stop Looking for a Short Cut” from his Mail I Get section of his blog which was a response to an email proposal from a reader to […]

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